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PostPosted: Sat Dec 20, 2014 12:00 pm 
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Project Introduction, Dec 18th, 2014: Welcome to Vorshlag's latest crazy project build thread. Many of you know how we have documented our various project builds on the forums over the past 12 years and this will be another fun one. I will be cross-posting this on a number of forums, shown in the list below. Pick your favorite, subscribe, and feel free to join in the conversation! If you've never seen my build threads before, there are links buried throughout (usually in bold) as well as LOTS of pictures. Click on any picture posted and it usually goes to a larger resolution version. I will embed car construction and race videos as well.
Before we get started I have to admit that this is just an introductory, background laying TEASER post. In it I will describe in basic terms what we are doing, and why, but we ARE NOT revealing what this new TT build car is until AFTER our first time trial competition event (NASA at MSR Houston Jan 17-18, 2015). Why? Everyone likes surprises, and I want to spring this on our competitors before they pitch a fit and leave the class, hehehe! This car will be built to run in a NASA Time Trial "letter class" (something from TTB to TTF) as well as SCCA Club Trials (when the two clubs' events don't overlap). We might sneak it into a few other series and classes, if it looks like a good fit.

Who Are These Vorshlag Guys?

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Some of you know Vorshlag (primarily a suspension parts manufacturing and supply company + street/competition prep shop) from our various online build threads, like our 2011 Mustang GT, shown above. We purchased this "test mule" to use for parts development, and with it we tested with 3 brands of shocks (AST, Moton and MCS), all with custom valving. We developed our second revision of the S197 camber plate set-up, helped Whiteline develop and test lots of parts, developed an 18x10" D-Force wheel for the S197 chassis, and tested and race proved Forgestar wheels, among other items.

We tested these things by campaigning it in various racing groups over the past past 4 years (GTA, SCCA, NASA, USCA, Optima, Goodguys) and it was extremely competitive in the last 2 seasons in NASA's TT3 class, with dozens of wins and setting 13 NASA class track records. We also won with this car in Optima/USCA, SCCA Club Trials, Goodguys autocrossing, and more. All of the development on this car has been shared on this Project Build Thread, but that car is currently for sale (here) and off limits to me on a race track from now on. We kind of went overboard on the custom fabrication and suspension work with that build, so somebody is going to get a smokin' deal when they buy it.

Low Budget Build This Time

This Mustang was an example of Winning at All Costs. While we could have spent even more on it, we focused our expenditure where it would help performance the most. We used the best suspension, high end aero parts, lots of custom body mods, and we ran on brand new "sticker" sets of Hoosier A6 tires ($1700 worth per weekend) at each event to guarantee success. Maybe we over did it... we set every TT3 track record for 2 years on the NASA Texas calendar and in 2014 had win margins over 2nd place by 5-7 seconds on most race days. Overkill costs extra. This DANGER ZONE project will be more about Winning with Low Costs, spending just enough to get that win, without massive overkill modifications or needless expenses. The inherent nature of the TT lettered classes limits our ability to go hog wild with spending or mods, too.

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Our TT3 Mustang was a big brawler - we ran it HEAVY, with the biggest tires Hoosier made, and with huge aero

We learned a lot of valuable lessons with the TT3 build, with breakthroughs and mistakes. We noticed what was worth the cost, and what was not, and shared these lessons publicly. While we had generally excellent results the last 2 years, the first 2 years of competition were a bust (poor planning on my part put it into the wrong series & wrong class), and even in 2014 I made a critical error that caused a high speed off (ran out of brake pad material & overheated the fluid). That little shunt at Road Atlanta caused some injuries to my back, but barely hurt the car or the splitter - this car is a tank! I am not keen to repeat those mistakes - so we will use all the test data we can get and over-do the safety aspects on this car (spending far more on safety upgrades than are required in Time Trial - so I'm not counting that in the "race prep" budget). That TT3 car progressed greatly the last 2 years, winning 13 of 15 NASA TT events in 2013 and all of the TT events we entered in 2014, while securing the Regional TT3 championships both years by huge margins (with the maximum possible 800 class points). We relearned the importance of tires (width and compound) in TT, the value of proper testing, where to spend money on suspension, and of course we experimented with aero.

At Vorshlag, when we purchase "shop car" it has always been to develop new parts for that chassis then to go prove those parts in competition. We usually only keep a development car for one or two years, jumping around from different makes and models that have ranged from BMWs, Mitsubishis, Subarus, Mazdas, Chevys, Fords and more. Running the same red Mustang four seasons in a row has somehow made us into a "Mustang shop" in many people's eyes, but Vorshlag is more than that - we make suspension products for over 24 different makes/models and prepare and build race-oriented cars for many motorsports venues, including autocross, HPDE, TT, Club Racing, Pikes Peak, drag race, rallycross, and even top speed competitions.

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This pair of Subarus we have worked on aren't track cars. Left one is made for running Bonneville, the other for Pikes Peak

We hope this new build will show some of the variety of cars we work on, across all budgets, and show off some of the fabrication and race prep skills our crew excels at. Of course we are known for LS1 swaps into BMWs (E30, E36, E46, Z3 - see below) and we have Alpha Builds (development projects for future kits) for the Miata NB chassis and Scion FR-S/Subaru BRZ as well. Sadly, project DANGER ZONE won't be getting LS1 V8 powered swap, but it will make good power for it's class.

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A lot of people that see us at the track or read our build thread think "These Vorshlag guys spend a lot of money!", but the reality is we build our cars to run on a tighter budget than you might think. How did we stay on sticker sets of Hoosier A6s in 2013 and 2014? We won all of them, except for 1 set purchased at the beginning of the 2013 season. Our service shop also has experienced mechanics and fabricators who do all of the work on our cars between paying customer work - so we have the manpower, tools and skills, but not always the big bags of cash. We kept the engine bone stock on our TT3 car because it was easier for us to do suspension and aero mods than "purchasing horsepower" (we don't build or tune motors here). We also have two guys in the front office that are crew chiefs on outside race teams, and everyone that works here is a racer with regular motorsports experience, track side and/or behind the wheel. So a lot of times we build the things that might seem "expensive" to others, but are really just hand built items that come from hard work and experience - which can often be worth more than just throwing money at a race car.

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We have done some very low budget builds, too. In late 2009 we wanted to try our hand at a budget-restricted magazine shootout, so we jumped into the Grassroots Motorsports sponsored $20XX Challenge. This is an annual 2-day competition event with 3 differing categories: autocross, drag race, and concours. You have roughly two grand to spend on the car and parts, plus a rigid set of rules to go by. With an all-volunteer crew (15 people helped put in 1200+ man hours!) we built a BMW E30 in my home garage with a truck LS-series V8 and ran it in the the GRM $2010 Challenge (as in: we spent less than $2010). We did fairly well that first year, learned a LOT by going to that event, recognized what mattered most by watching the winners, and came back in 2011 and won the whole thing. Lots of people fell in love with that car - whether it was the home built wide body, the nasty little V8 under hood, the BMW Art Car inspired graphics for 2011, or the extensive custom fabrication work done throughout the car to keep the parts budget low.

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I also ran our little GRM E30 in NASA TTU class where it fit with the power to weight ratio it ended up with, and had a blast there as well. After a few upgrades it was actually a better track car than an autocross car, funny enough. We cleaned it up, added a splitter, added some good looking 18x11" CCW wheels and sold that car for $18 grand... so sometimes your budget builds DO pay off after all!

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Our very first NASA TT car was the TTU BMW E36 LS1 shown above, and it set an overall TT track record in its debut event way back in 2008. After that car left our stable we had a couple of other autocross cars that we ran briefly in TT lettered classes as well. My blue 2001 BMW E46 330 coupe (below left) was built initially around SCCA's DSP autocross class, flared with big 285s under all four corners, but it proved to be a MUCH better track car in TTD. It was run exactly one time and set a TTD record in the process. Same went for our STU autocross prepped 1997 BMW M3, which set a TTC record in one outing without any considerations made for track use.

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These two Bimmers were initially built as SCCA autocross cars but ran briefly - and won - in NASA TT lettered classes

Before This Our 2015 Race Season Looked... Bleak!

After the last two successful seasons running our Mustang in NASA TT3 and a couple of other series, this car was tidied up for SEMA with new flares, new paint, and new aero. We ran it at the Optima Challenge after SEMA, then when we came back home in November it went up for sale. The car looks so perfect right now that nobody here will let me take it out on track. They think I'll bang up the bodywork or paint... and with as wild as I drive, they are probably right. ;) It now sits to await its new buyer, untouched and undriven.

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A major shop upgrade + new machines and equipment + extended SEMA/Optima trip all cost a lot of money

We just moved into a new shop that is twice as big as our old place, and did construction here for 6 weeks before we moved. The move happened 2 days before we went to SEMA, which was a 10 day trip for almost everyone here at Vorshlag. The pair of CNC machines arrived a month later. So needless to say, a lot of money was spent on the pre-SEMA car work, the move, construction and equipment of late. My "its a done deal" buyer for the Mustang fell through right before SEMA, too. All of that combined put a serious dent in my personal 2015 racing budget!

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There's a whole program of cars I was hoping to kick off with a shop built BMW E46 with a BIG nasty LS1 motor planned, and I've got 3 more chassis sitting in my home shop along with this E46, awaiting this turn-key race car program to start. But getting the drivetrain parts and wheels alone is going to take about $20K in cash, which seems to be missing at the moment, heh. So this project is delayed a bit while we get our CNC machines up and running and finish the construction at the new shop, so that meant no Vorshlag team car would be on track for at least 6 months. Sucks.

In Texas we race dang near year round. We did some track testing with the new S550 Mustang as recently as this December and there are NASA and SCCA road course events we need to hit in January and February, so there's no "off season" to complete any big build. Even if we kicked off the E46 build TODAY it wouldn't be on track until May or June. That's the majority of our Texas race season, and NASA Nationals West is in August. Long story short: We're out of time, and need to make a quick, low budget race car to be able to make the 2015 NASA race season.

continued below


Last edited by Fair on Mon Dec 29, 2014 3:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sat Dec 20, 2014 12:05 pm 
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continued from above

I had all but written off racing at all in 2015, but as luck would have it, something came up that was too good to be true. Tomorrow I am picking up a semi-finished race car that will be our new "quick build" race car project. Until we fix a few things, and do a track test, I'm keeping "identities withheld to protect the innocent", so the make and model of the car are under wraps. It will be prepped and stored off site in a secret skunkworks facility...

NASA Time Trial Classing - A Brief Summary

This next bit might be confusing, but I'll be quick. So NASA Time Trial series rules are nearly identical to the Super Touring (ST) wheel to wheel club racing ruleset, without a lot of the safety requirements. Those two series' subsets of classes have a lot of common competition rules but with two distinctly different main philosophies. The "Lettered Classes" (TTB/TTC/TTD/TTE/TTF) are set-up where every car model gets assigned a "base class" then you get 19 points per class to use for "mods", which could be added tire width, aftermarket springs, aero tricks, various tire compounds have differing points values, motor upgrades, etc. If you modify the car beyond your allocated 19 points the car bumps up a class (like from TTD to TTC), and you get another 19 points to use in that class.

NASA Time Trial Rules: http://www.nasa-tt.com/rules

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We bought the Vorshlag shop TTB, TTE and TTU cars to a NASA event once and ran them all. That was a hectic day...

These classes also each have their own minimum weight to power ratio that you cannot exceed even if your points expenditure is on lowering weight or horsepower additions, and each base classing includes a "base weight" you start with. If you want to run lighter than the base weight, it costs you points. If you want to run more tire than the base class tire, points. Some base classing also come with either a 7 or 14 point penalty, too (one star or two stars).

Each competition letter class has an assigned a minimum “Adjusted Weight/Power Ratio”. Regardless of how many points a car has, or which base class it begins in, it may not exceed the minimum “Adjusted Weight/Power Ratio” for its competition class. We will have to play with weights or power levels to stick with the limit for the class we're choosing, which could be one of the following:
  • TTB 10.50:1 (10.5 pounds per dyno measured wheel horsepower)
  • TTC 12.00:1
  • TTD 14.25:1
  • TTE 16.50:1
  • TTF 19.50:1
In the past 8 years I've competed in TTU, TT2, TT3, TTA (now gone), TTB, TTC, and TTD - and this car might be in one of those classes. :D Each letter class is also has an assigned "base tire width", regardless of what the OEM tire is. That list is below. Note: TTG and TTH (shown below) only exist for base classing, but these two classes are not acknowledged in TT competition. You have to class up to at least TTE, the slowest class allowed to run, for safety and "speed difference" reasons. With TTU and TT1 cars on the same track it would be a miracle if they didn't catch the TTG/TTH cars in the first lap, heh. Look up the cars classed in TTH and you will see what I mean - S-L-O-W!

TTB: 265mm, TTC: 255mm, TTD: 245mm, TTE: 235mm, TTF: 215mm, TTG: 195mm, TTH: 175mm

Here as is small sample of typical base class listings I looked up.
  • BMW 330 ('01-'06) (factory 225hp models)... base class TTE... minimum weight 3285 lbs... Base tire is 235mm, power to weight limit is 16.5:1. You have 19 to play with before bumping up a class and could dyno a maximum 199 whp at the minimum weight shown (with driver).
  • Ford Mustang GT ('05-'06)... base class TTD**... minimum weight 3450 lbs... Base tire 245mm. power to weight limit is 14.25:1. Two stars (-14 penalty) means you only have 5 points to play with before bumping up a class and could dyno a maximum 242 whp running at the minimum weight shown (with driver).
  • Mazda RX-8 (R3 model) ('09-'11) ... base class TTC... minimum weight 3045 lbs... Base tire 255mm, power to weight limit is 12:1. You have 19 to play with before bumping up a class and could dyno a maximum 253 whp at the minimum weight shown (with driver).

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The inherently faster and less rules encumbered "Numbered classes" (TT1/TT2/TT3) are different, since there are no longer "points" and modifications are almost completely "free". The power to weight ratio is what dictates which class you end up in (1/2/3/U). Many modern sports cars are so fast in stock form they get a base classing in TT1/2/3, and can't play the letter class games. There are "modifiers" to the TT1/2/3 power to weight ratio for major mods like: non-DOT racing slicks, sequential transmissions, AWD, tube frame chassis, and other major changes like that.

TT3 is unique in that any non-base trim level OEM aero mods cost you a big +0.4 modifier penalty on your power to weight limit (we took that in our Mustang build, for example), but aero mods are free in TT1 and TT2. TTU is the "Unlimited" class for NASA TT as well - you can run it as light and as powerful as you want, so long as it meets safety rules and has bodywork over the wheels (NASA eschews all open wheeled race cars).



That was a brief summary only, and I hope that made sense. We wrote this basic primer on NASA TT back in 2008, and of course the TT rules are linked above.

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We like making track cars fly - using non-stock aero tricks helps in Numbered Classes, but costs "lots of points" in Lettered Classes

We weighed the options for our TT3 Mustang early on and decided to take the "non-stock aero" penalty (running a massive wing out back and big splitter/ducted hood up front), maxed out the power to weight ratio (running at 3802 pounds to keep power at 433 whp peak, off of an adjusted 8.8:1 pounds per horsepower ratio), and ran the biggest, stickiest tires made by Hoosier (335F/345R Hoosier A6). On that car we realized in late 2012 that a softer tire compounds (A6) would allow us to get our fastest lap in the first two laps, before the front of the field tends to catch the back markers, which usually ensured a traffic free lap. That matters. We also noted the wider we went on tires (we started at 265, then went to 275, 305, 315, 335 and 345) the faster the car got. The added areo helped the car in high speed corners, of course, but also seemed to make braking better as well. We hope to apply some of this experience on our new TT car here, which is almost old enough to qualify as a vintage car, but spend less than 1/10th the budget. Will it work?? Are we delusional or genius?? You shall soon see...

Maximum Effect from Minimal Investment

This time we're NOT starting with a $40,000 brand new car, we're starting with an aging 24 year old... well.... beater. This car was purchased by the previous owner for $3000, and then he sold the interior bits and some other discarded parts and recouped $1000 of that, so it was s cheap starting point ($2K!). He then semi-prepped it for TT use but got busy with other projects and he suddenly wanted it gone - so it will soon come to our "secret offsite shop" to knock out the repairs and finish race preparations in the next 4 weeks.

Why did we choose this car? Well it happens to be "base classed" particularly well, and once people who know TT classes see where it ends up they might cry foul - but is has been classed there for many years and I've been waiting for someone to build one. We will document all of the modifications we do openly, show all testing performed looking for every ounce of speed, and post any race wins or losses along the way. Like we tend to do with all of our builds, we will be pouring over the rules looking for the optimum modifications allowed, and with several 25+ year veterans of amateur and pro racing working at Vorshlag, we know how read rules and seek out the most advantages possible.

"Rulebook Research" and bench racing is part of the fun of building a new race car, for us, and we've probably spent over 25 hours so far just looking at the "free" mods allowed in TT. We have run countless permutations allocating every point in the class (it isn't going to jump up a class), and going over every tire width/compound option, but there are still many unknowns in this build. Will an aero trick worth two points be worth more than a cat-back exhaust? We'll test that. What about this +10 point compound narrow tire vs a much wider +2 point tire? Testing it. Can it meet the power-to-weight limit? We'll dyno test the car early and often through the build.

Image [URLhttp://vorshlag.smugmug.com/Projects/Vorshlag-2011-Mustang-GT-build/i-xdqpCHs/0/X3/DSC_6070-X3.jpg]Image[/URL]

Of course it wouldn't be a Vorshlag build without digital scale pics; we will weigh EVERYTHING we touch. A lot of the interior has already been removed (its 400 pounds under the "base weight", so it will be getting some serious ballast added along with my 200 pound body) and nearly 50 pounds of drivetrain mass has been removed (100% legally), so the bone stock OEM motor is pretty "peppy". Look forward to lots of tech in this build thread which you might enjoy reading - or enjoy applying to your own track build.

If You're Not First You're Last

That Ricky Bobby logic above is going to apply here. As with our most recent TT build, pushing the limits but keeping it 100% legal is our goal for this project, so we won't be satisfied with anything other than a dominant performance and squeaky clean results in after-race inspections. We want to set ALL of the track records, win ALL of the trophies, get ALL of the points, and take home ALL of the contingency tires ... we basically want to swoop into a class we've not run before, act like a school yard bully and take all of the lunch money! :D

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We will be adding a roll cage and fire system, but that's not going to be shown as part of the TT "race prep budget"

Total build budget for this build for the 2015 season we are shooting for is $7500, all-in with initial purchase price + parts. That's not a lot of money for what we think we can pull off with this car, and what we predict the lap times will be (shooting for 6-8 seconds a lap slower than our TT3 records). We will continually be upgrading the car all season, as shop time and budget permits, and it will have proper safety gear (full cage, fire system, nets) very quickly. Who knows - it might even become legal for the mating ST class?

Tune in next time to see if we managed to win our first TT race or failed in epic fashion - either way, it will be entertaining! I will go back after the January NASA race coverage and show the initial 4 week build-up, any pre-race testing, and all of that. I also reserve the right to delete this thread and disavow all knowledge of it if the results are dismal. :P

What's Next + Vorshlag 2015 Race Schedule

These are the Time Trial and other competition events we want to enter with this car in 2015:

  • January 17-18 - NASA @ MSR-Houston Clockwise
  • January 17-18 - SCCA Club Trials @ MSR-Cresson (GRR! Why do they book the same weekends!?!)
  • February 14-15 - SCCA Club Trials @ TWS
  • March 14-15 - NASA @ MSR-Cresson
  • March 22 - Goodguys AAS at TMS (200 treadwear)
  • March 28-29 - USCA @ TMS (200 treadwear)
  • April 25-26 - NASA @ TWS
  • June 13-14 - NASA @ Hallett Summer Shootout
  • July 31-Aug 2 - NASA @ Laguna Seca - Western States Championships
  • September 4-6 - NASA @ VIR - Eastern States Championships
  • September 26-27 - NASA @ MSR-Houston Counter-Clockwise
  • October 17-18 - NASA @ "TBA" (???)
  • November - NASA @ "TBA" (probably ECR)

The main goal is to hit all of the NASA Texas events, and while the Laguna Seca "NASA Nationals West" event isn't that likely for us, "NASA Nationals East" at VIR might be in the cards. Right now we have only FOUR weeks until our first NASA race (we will skip SCCA for NASA, you double-booking dingbats), so its going to be a thrash to get it prepped for track use in less than 30 days! Our shop is very booked with suspension and race prep work, so I will work on it after hours if need be to get it done. Sleep is for the dead!

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Our fab shop just took this street car and turned it into an ST3 prepped race car - cage, wiring, fire systems, aero - in 6 weeks

This is going to a gutted/stripped car with NO compromises for street use at all, which we believe gives us the best chance for success. Daily driven cars haven't won many (any?) TT national championships with NASA in a while. This car has some great prep by the previous owner but it still needs some basic upgrades before it is fully track ready. We need to swap out the radiator for a racing-duty version, add an oil cooler, build in some major front brake ducting, install a proper racing seat (have one sitting in the lobby that I will steal), bolt in some harnesses and wrap them around a 4-point roll bar (initially; cage will be done hopefully by the February event). It also needs tires, a new windshield and a few other small repairs. Again, this is a CHEAP car to start with but when we're done its going to be embarrassingly quick on track. Cheap and Quick!

My final reason for building and racing this car in 2015 is - I'm a degenerate racing junkie, and I was clawing my eyes out thinking I was going to miss the next race season. Sure, I'm bummed that we cannot have the TT1 car built in time to run with NASA this year, so this was my only possible racing option. But I figured that running in a quarter century old beater has to be more fun than NOT racing anything at all, right?

What's in a Name?

We're going to be focusing exclusively on The Things That Matter, so there will be very little time spent on cosmetic improvements or other frivolous upgrades. But of course we do have a vinyl plotter, and a big part of running this car is MARKETING for Vorshlag, so we will throw some simple graphics on the car. They may be based on the Martini stripes on the Porsche 918 shown below (substituted with Vorshlag's Red/Black/Silver colors). We're trying to show that we can make anything fast and win, even aging 1980s era cars that have been mostly forgotten.

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“Something, something, danger zone! I know. I’m not even trying anymore.” - Sterling Archer

We've come up with a project name (gotta call it something other than "Broke Ass, Last Minute Backup Racing Plan") which has some obscure references to the 1980s, when this particular car was designed. After about 3 minutes of brainstorming I overruled everyone with taste and picked Project (DANGER ZONE), which might make more sense when we get this thing on track. We tossed around some ideas to get there, like: the fact that this car designed in the 1980s, it may or may not have been on a cheesy 80's detective show called Miami Vice, which led us to the cars featured in Grand Theft:Auto Vice City, which inevitably led us to the last season of ARCHER season 5: Vice. That's only one missing step to tie into Kevin Bacon, I think. And who doesn't like Archer? Think of all the quotes I can use in my write-ups! This car would fit in well that TV series, if we added an in-dash mini-bar.

...and THAT'S how you get ants...

Other than those obscure hints, I'm keeping my lips sealed. The car will be built at a secret location (AJ Foyt's basement), so no matter what you think see in the Vorshlag shop, I won't reveal this dirty little secret until after Jan 17th. I will be posting more clues on the Vorshlag Facebook page, so keep an eye out there.

Until next time,

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Terry Fair @ Vorshlag Motorsports


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 20, 2014 2:28 pm 
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Terry, are you too tall for a Miata?
Is it a convertible? (4 point roll bar now, cage later)

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PostPosted: Sat Dec 20, 2014 2:38 pm 
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EricJo wrote:
Terry, are you too tall for a Miata?
Is it a convertible? (4 point roll bar now, cage later)


I have both owned and raced Miatas, and can fit in one with a custom seat... but at 6'3" with a stock seat, this is the result, below.

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Broomstick test FAIL! :evil:


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2014 3:06 pm 
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Project Update for December 29th, 2014: This is an unexpected update - I'm going to break "radio silence" early because too many of you have guessed the car we are building before it's first race. Many of the guesses were hilarious and infinitely entertaining, and some of them were pretty good ideas for TT builds. More importantly this little project got some engagement and feedback. I'm always looking for feedback and comments, in case you have a better idea or way to do something, so keep it up! Now let's get to the answers to "The What and the Why" in this update.

Lucky guesses and True Detectives

Here were the initial clues I put in the first post, then some follow up clues on social media and various replies to questions and guesses on the forums. The clues became more specific as more folks chimed in with better ideas and guesses. If they gave their reasoning in their replies I would often answer yes or no, which led to more clues over the past few weeks.

  • It's not a Mustang
  • It's nearly 25 years old (so roughly a 1991 or 1992 model)
  • It's a chassis designed in the 1980s + something related to Miami Vice?
  • It does not have an LSx V8 in it, but it will be run with the factory installed engine
  • Worth about $3000 nowadays (in poor condition!), when purchased right
  • Not a turbo nor a 4 cylinder, and definitely not Front Wheel Drive
  • I stated that we would be racing on a tire 30mm smaller than the OEM size
  • I drove through Madisonville, Texas on the way to pick up the car from Dallas (hence a lot of guesses that it was in Houston)
  • After picking the car up I said it had a flywheel/clutch 50 pounds lighter than stock, and spun the tires through the 1st three gears
  • I hinted that I had possibly owned one of these cars before, and towards the end I said it was domestically produced
  • Lastly I said I worked "under the bonnet" one day last week, but then admitted not everyone calls it that but it was "more than just a hood"

All of these things were 100% true. The "Danger Zone" name was the only red herring, heh. That last clue was what triggered an avalanche of correct guesses. Jason Newman was the first to guess correctly - and he knew he was right a week before anyone else - with only about half the clues. That guess gets him a free Vorshlag T-shirt! Several others guessed "C4" along the way as well.

My Past Was Also A Hint

It helped that Jason knew more about me than most - he was a racing friend from college, when I raced in and helped run the largest collegiate sports car club in the country, the Texas A&M Sports Car Club. This was a club with over 150 members when I was there and we had one of the best autocross sites in the country - an old air force base that the school owned (Riverside Annex).

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Left: My 1994 LT1 6-spd Corvette Z07. Right: One of three V8 1992 Camaro 1LE/B4Cs (ex-pursuit) I owned

We set up huge autocrosess there, joining multiple runways at times. We also had lots of fun at nearby Texas World Speedway (TWS) running annual time trial events we called Aggiecross. This little college club was holding Time Trials back in the late 1980s, which didn't happen in NASA for decades. A lot of us worked at TWS while we were in school, and when we worked corners for PCA HPDE events we got free track time in our clunky, broke-ass student cars as well.

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Left: My ex-pursuit 1987 Mustang LX 5.0 was one of 6 Foxes I've owned. Right: Amy's 92 Mustang GT and my 1969 Mustang (C Prepared)

During my time racing with TAMSCC, both during college and after, I ran in a variety of cars. Since I was the proverbial "starving student" while in school many of these cars were crappy and cheap, but most of them still V8 powered and RWD. When I met Amy she had an 86 RX7 but once she raced in some of my cars she jumped to Mustangs and then Firebirds. Between us we've owned about 16 pony cars (Camaros and Mustangs) of various years, from 1969 through 2013 models. Two years after graduating I landed my second post-college job, which allowed me to commute from the same town (College Station). I was making great money in an oil field mechanical engineering position, and had extremely low living expenses. At one point there I owned 7 cars, including two project builds and an immaculate two year old Corvette (the white 1994 shown above).

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Left: Amy's supercharged 1994 Trans Am on 17x11" HREs. Right: Her 1998 LS1 Formula

I tell you this because knowing what I used to own and race in my "Pre-Vorshlag Days" (nowadays I typically do NOT buy the cars I want but instead buy cars that need suspension development) helped clue in some old friends that knew this was to be a LOW budget build, but that somehow I knew it would be fast. Three amigos of mine were the ones to ferreted out the last few clues and got to the correct answer without question, before I confirmed it to them privately. These guys knew me too well, and were more racers from my days running with the TAMSCC: Matt Miller, John Scheier, and Doug Willie

Yet nobody correctly guessed that we'd keep it in TTC class.

Project Danger Zone Is...

So get on with the answer already! Sheesh...

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This is the car we're building. It looks great, from this angle. This photo was staged perfectly - its a mess from any other angle!

This is it. What you are looking at is a 1992 Chevrolet Corvette 6-speed that is bone stock, except for being stripped of a nasty old interior. This is a base trim level car with the factory 5.7L "LT1" (Gen II) 300 hp iron block V8 and ZF S6-40 6-speed manual transmission. It has the strong Dana 44 rear axle assembly (not the Dana 36 that came in the early C4s and automatics). This particular car has 68K original miles and from the angle shown above doesn't look at all like a $2000 car. Regardless of how clean it looks now it was still a hot mess when purchased.

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The entire interior is gutted, even most of the dash. We will finish what was started and put the dash cap back on

I will go over the issues on this specific car as we chronicle the repairs and upgrades to it this season. The previous owner (Brian Matteucci) has done a lot of repairs and refurbishment, and even a couple upgrades but we still have a laundry list of safety updates to tackle, as well as a few performance mods to "max it out" for TTC class points. We are keeping the car legal for TTC class so there aren't a whole lot of "points" we can burn on upgrades, so the car will remain stock in many aspects. Luckily, a stock 1992 Corvette doesn't suck!

Why is the C4 Still A Worthwhile Track Rat?

To understand why we consider this 24 year old car still relevant, we need to look at how this car was designed and what it came with that was ahead of its time. Here is a brief look at the C4 generation Corvette, which was produced from 1984 to 1996.

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We're already getting to work on this 1992 Corvette at Vorshlag. Parts are ordered and it was detailed by yours truly

GM calls the Corvette chassis the Y-body and it has been produced from 1953-current in 7 distinct chassis generations (see the [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chevrolet_Corvette"]Corvette Wiki[/url]). The "C4" generation was designed in the early 1980s and was delayed a bit before launched as a 1984 model (there was no 1983 Corvette). This chassis was a huge leap in sophistication from the C3 chassis it replaced. None of the subsequent Y-body chassis were this revolutionary - C5, C6 and C7 all share design aspects of the C4 and are instead mostly refinements (yes, the C5 had some serious updates!). The C4 was the first "Billion Dollar Chassis" design in the history of automobiles - and it doesn't share anything with any other GM chassis, so there was nothing to be gained for another, mass produced chassis (exception: almost all engines developed in the Corvette make their way into the F-body chassis and others).

With fairly low production numbers each year this has got to be a "loss leader" for General Motors at only about $40,000 when this car was new in 1991. And now with 3 newer generations of Corvette following the C4, this chassis has bottomed out in resale value - its not old enough to be considered a classic but its not new enough to be worth a lot of money. Some year C4s can be had for next to nothing, and even the later C4s can be snatched up cheap if it has any issues (like this one) and made into a low buck race car faster and more sophisticated than 75% of the cars at any given NASA race weekend. And this 1992 model one of the best of the C4 generation.

Engines: The C4 had 4 major engine designs in its 13 year run (1984-1996), which began in 1984 model with the abysmal Cross Fire V8. This was a horrid, 205 hp, early attempt at a fuel injected V8 and a complete carryover from the outgoing 1982 C3 Corvette. The Crossfire L83 has ZERO redeeming qualities and was only used for one model year in the C4. Starting in 1985 was the 5.7L L98, better known as the Tuned Port Injected or "TPI" V8. These long runner intake equipped V8s had LOADS of low end torque but petered out above 4000 rpms. With aluminum heads this "Gen I" Small Block Chevy (SBC) made decent power for the early 1980s (230 hp then up to 250 hp) but stuck around far too long (through 1991 model).

This was followed by the revolutionary 300hp 5.7L "LT1" Gen-II V8 in 1992, considered the first new design in the Small Block Chevy's long history (hence the Generation II engine; the LS1 in 1997 was the Gen III). There's tons of data out there about this motor, of course. In 1996 there was a special edition version of this motor called the "LT4" made 330 hp. Lastly, during the middle of the C4 model run was the LT5 DOHC V8 that came in the ZR1 (1990-95, 385-405 hp), which was a technological marvel for its time but was quickly overshadowed by the all aluminum OHV V8 that came out in the C5 - the LS1.

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The [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GM_small-block_engine#LT1"]Gen-II LT1 engine[/url] was unique in that it only lasted 5 model years, but it was also used in the 4th Gen F-body (1993-97 Camaro/Firebird) and the Caprice/Impala (1994-96 B-body) as well as one Cadillac (1994-96 Fleetwood). The reverse flow cooling was a big change but other than the bump to 10.5:1 compression ratio, produced very little benefit, and this "reverse" cooling style (heads cooled before block) was dropped in the Gen III LS1. The distributor (Optispark) is very unusual; it is driven by the camshaft and tucked behind the water pump. It is somewhat problematic and prone to water damage, but the later '95-96 "vented" style works better and aftermarket versions better still. The intake manifold is about as far from the TPI motors as you can get - it has larger but very short runners which produce a higher RPM range and a much flatter torque curve than the tractor motor curve of the TPI.

The Y-body LT1 always got 4-bolt main bearing caps (the other's all had 2-bolt mains), but the 1992 Corvette's LT1 is unique in one key way. The TPI motors (1985-1991) all used a crude form of Fuel Injection called batch fire port injection, and used a Mass Air Flow meter to meter incoming air into the engine. These early MAF designs used a circuit board that was in the airstream and were problematic from day one. The 1993-96 Y-body and 1993-97 F-body LT1/4 engines went to a more modern hot wire element MAF with the electronics housed outside of the airstream. But for the 1992 Corvette (and 1993 F-body) this new EFI system wasn't ready and for one model year only GM went with a speed density air metering system (no MAF). This uses Manifold Pressure Sensor along with a atmospheric pressure sensor to read incoming air. This lack of a MAF means a lack of a restriction in the airstream for that one year - and the 1992 model ran the strongest of all of the LT1s in stock form.

The manual transmissions used in the early C4s (1984-88 models) was a Doug Nash designed "4+3" transmission – a 4-speed manual coupled to an automatic overdrive on the top three gears. It was designed to improve fuel economy but was mostly a steaming pile of crap. For the 1989-96 model Y-bodies, GM went to the Germans and they offered up the [url="http://www.zfdoc.com/techinfo.htm"]S6-40[/url], made by ZF. It is an unusual transmission and parts are hard to come by, and shops have popped up like [url="http://www.zfdoc.com/faq.htm"]ZFDoc[/url] that specialize in rebuilding these brutes. This trans is nicknamed the "ZF6" and is big, heavy and very strong, if a bit noisy. With 6 speeds and 2 overdrives (.75 in 5th and .50 in 6th), it made for excellent fuel economy. The Borg Warner/Tremec copied these overdrives for the later T56. With the ZF6 tall 2.68 first gear, the "black tag" version is rated to withstand 450+ ft lbs of torque (and is much stronger with a modern carbon synchro upgrade). To quiet the noises, GM used a heavy dual mass flywheel, which tips the scales at over 40 pounds. The clutch is also strong and the Dana 44 rear differential out back is also a brute. The limited slip unit in these 44s tends to last decades... and I hope so because we're not touching it. The halfshafts are big beefy aluminum tubular units with U-joints (cheap to replace!) instead of CV joints, and the driveshaft is built the same way.

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The body is fairly aerodynamic (low height, low drag, small front area) and works well at high speeds. The body panels are made of fiberglass - which is good considering it has some chunks missing, and fiberglass is easy to repair. Some damned fool drove this car through a barbed wire fence back in its' checkered past, which damaged the front bumper cover and body panels on the left side. The driver's door was trashed but the replacement doesn't match the car's white paint well, so that will likely get repainted at some point. I will patch the fiberglass that is damaged myself and prime it for later repaint.

continued below


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2014 3:09 pm 
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continued from above

Where Did This Car Come From?

So about 3 years ago an old friend, Brian Matteucci, wanted to build a NASA Time Trial car. He was a long time autocrosser and former SCCA W2W Club Racer and watched what we were doing in NASA. He liked the cost-to-seat-time ratio of the TT series of classes, which was why we were in it as well. I helped him understand the NASA TT rules as well as the confusing TT classing formula and points classing system. We bench raced several builds over a few weeks and came up with the C4. That was no accident - because we had both raced these in the past. My history with Matteucci goes way back to about 1989, when he was a racer in the Texas A&M Sport Car club racing in a notchback 5.0L Mustang... I was about a year ahead of him and happened to be racing the same exact type of car.

We were competitors and friends through college, both helped create a new and popular autocross class called Super Street Mod in 1990 (we used this class to help push the SCCA to create Street Mod), and were roommates after college when we both worked at our first jobs in Houston as engineers. He and I both used to love digging through rule books looking for ringer cars and rules to exploit. After college we both autocrossed C4 Corvettes for a time - he was in a 1987 Z51 while I raced a 1994 Z07, both in SCCA's Super Stock class. When his 87 Corvette's fuel pump died on day 2 at Solo Nationals one year he co-drove my C4 - and hated it. ;)

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My 1994 Corvette Z07 running in Super Stock at Solo Nationals in 1998. It was on Hoosier DOTs but was otherwise bone stock

The differences between our cars was dramatic back then - at low speed autocrosses - but it was obvious to both of us that the LT1 was far superior to the TPI engines at higher speeds. Already owning a C5 Z06, when he suggested a letter class TT build 3 years ago I immediately suggested another Corvette, but one that was a 100% dedicated, no-compromise race car build. Jason and I here at Vorshlag had often talked about the TTC classing of the late C4, and after some discussion with Matteucci, he agreed that it had a lot of potential in this class. He went out and bought this mess for $3000, sold off the interior bits for $1000, and had a $2000 platform to build a TT lettered class car from.

During the next 2-1/2 years Matteucci proceeded to strip hundreds of pounds out of this car and replaced lots of broken OEM bits (24 years can take its toll on anything), while testing it at various autocross events along the way. He did this while he was very busy with work, building a new house and shop, building a chump car, and autocrossing his C5 Z06. In December 2014 he got to a good stopping point and I bought the car for a great price - along with a promise to let him co-drive the car with me in NASA TT. Amy and I did that last year and it was a good way to get us both out on track for less money spent - which fits this project well.

With our "Team Vorshlag" entry we can both drive the car for one entry fee, doubling the chances for a fast time (two sets of eyes and brains are better than one). Matteucci worked at Roush Engineering for several years, and while there was responsible for building and developing a fleet of Bonduraunt school cars when Ford was their supplier in the 2000s. He lived at the track for many months, driving these cars for hours every day, so he's no stranger to finding a good track set-up: he was paid by one of the biggest engineering/racing companies in the world to do just this.

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Left: The factory power steering cooler is a huge double-pass unit. Right: I pressure washed underneath to help find an oil leak

Last but not least, Matteucci was also the designer of our first three initial camber plate designs when he started Motor-Force Engineering back in 2002. We bought his company (and IP) back in early 2006 and several of the current Vorshlag camber plates can trace their roots back to his initial designs. Other than some manufacturing aspects and tweaks to materials and coatings, they are for the most part unchanged. So he has a long history with me and Vorshlag, whether he wants to admit it or not, heh. When I picked up the car on December 20th I gave him a bunch of Vorshlag swag, which was part of the deal with the car - he has to wear this stuff at the track, especially if he is the one who gets the wins!

TT Classing Looks Solid

So if you look at the NASA TT (and PT) classification for Corvettes something jumps out at you (go to [url="https://nasa-assets.s3.amazonaws.com/document/document/292/time_trial_rules.pdf"]page 20 of the TT rules[/url]) - most Corvettes either require a dyno test for an initial base classing (C1-C3) or are just shoved straight into TT1/2/3 numbered classes (C5-C7). The lone exception is the C4 generation, which has 5 separate letter class listings:

MODEL........................................BASE CLASS...... MIN WT
Corvette C4 ('85-'91)............................ TTD**......3223
Corvette C4 ('92-'96) (LT1)................ TTC*.......3203
Corvette C4 (LT4 option) (330 hp)...... TTC**......3350
Corvette GS ('96).................................. TTC**......3350
Corvette ZR-1 ('90-'95).......................... TTB*........3500

While the TTD entry for the 1984-1991 "TPI" Corvettes might look the most attractive place to start at first glance, the minimum weight is higher yet they make a lot less power (230-250 hp) than the LT1s. With two stars it is already -14 points out of 19 in TTD class, and strapped with TTD's 245mm base tire size, so it would be nearly impossible to stay in TTD class, meaning it would need a lot of work to be competitive in TTC. Of course upclassing adds 20 points to play with, so it might make the 12:1 power to weight ratio of TTC, with some dollars and points burned on engine upgrades. The two LT4 powered cars (all 1996 6-speed cars and the '96 Grand Sport) have an extra star (-14 points in class) and extra 150 pounds of minimum weight, but the only advantage being +30 hp over the LT1 it is not ideal (plus they are worth more money used). Likewise the ZR1 has +300 pounds more minimum weight (and boy were they heavy!) and its up a class (TTB) and has one star (-7), plus these are somewhat rare and pricey, and expensive to maintain and upgrade. Yuck.

So the lighter, rugged and simple 1992-1996 LT1 cars are really the best bet, in my mind. TTC seems like an odd place to class the 1992-96 LT1 Corvette - and it might well be, but it is pretty old and I doubt many (any?) have been competitively run in NASA TT or PT. We shall soon find out if this base class makes sense, because that's where we are going to run it.

TTC 1992 Corvette Build Basics

While several folks guessed we would be building a "C4 in TTB", nobody guessed the TTC angle. And why would you? With the base classing of TTC* we only have 14 points to play with in class, so how could it be as "fast" as I predicted? For one, it doesn't need any points spent on power mods to meet the max power-to-weight ratio, as it will easily make the 12:1 limit for the class. So we save points there. How do I know? I owned a nearly identical 1994 Corvette that I had dyno'd on a modern DynoJet, where it made 277 whp in bone stock form, back in 1996 (these cars were a hair under-rated at "300 hp" crank). Another TAMSCC racer (Mike Mclure) owned a 1996 LT4 Corvette and dyno'd it at 308 whp the same day on the same dyno (also under-rated by the factory). If you know your dyno numbers, you will see that the LT4 makes almost exactly what a stock LS1 makes in a C5 (~310 whp), and the LT1 just a little bit down on that.

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Left: The 12" front brakes are adequate but can be upgraded to 13" rotors "for free" (no points). Right: The ABS system is ahead of its time

The factory brakes are also ahead of other cars from this era and not much if any off of the C5. GM developed its best ABS systems on the Y-body and this 1992 model has one of the best of the generation. And while the 12" diameter front brakes seem a little wimpy on the Base Trim Model, which this car has, they aren't total junk. The calipers are twin piston floating PBR units, a cast aluminum design used on the Y-body, F-body, and even the SN95 Mustang Cobra, to name a few. We have found a way in digging through the rules and Base Trim Level of the 1992-96 Corvettes to upgrade the discs to thicker, 13" diameter discs for zero points (more on that soon), so that saves us points and only costs a few dollars.

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We will show better suspension pics in the next update, but these will do for now

Suspension is very advanced for the time period, and better than what many of us race with on brand new cars from today. Forged aluminum uprights at both ends pivot on double A-arms up front and a multi-link rear IRS. Both ends are sprung by a composite transverse leaf with factory monotube Bilstein dampers. Other than some freshening and an alignment we're going to leave that pretty much alone.

Last up is the tires. The late C4 was designed to house massive wheels and tires (factory used 17x9.5" on almost all packages and up to 17x11" out back). While we won't be making flares to house big wheels, which is kind of one of our "go to" first mods, we will blow almost ALL of the available class points on tires (more on that next time).

Why not bump up to TTB? Sure, we think this car could be just as competitive there at this class' more aggressive 10.5:1 pounds-per-hp ratio, but it would allow for a lot more mods, and that costs $$. The goal of this is to keep costs down, but with +20 more points to play with after upclassing we could easily spend an extra $10,000 chasing down the points and the top cars in TTB (S2000 + E46 M3). While this would be fun, that's not our goal for the 2015 season. We want to instead focus on the "free mods" that TT allows as well as spend our precious 13 points as wisely as we can, as well as show some of our best "race prep" and safety upgrades - that are the same for virtually all classes.

In the next post we will sow our first few mods - brakes and shocks - that are both zero point upgrades. We will also show our first point mod and show the behind the scenes upgrades and race prep.

What's Next?

I always close my build thread posts with a teaser for the next entry. Well we haven't done much to the car yet, so there's still a lot of track prep to knock out. We did order OEM replacement brake parts and shocks, all zero point upgrades which I will explain in my next post. The next biggest things the C4 needs before the first event are all safety related.

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In early 2014 our crew here built the cage and did all of the fire/safety/lighting upgrades for a 1987 Corvette convertible that was initially run in Lemons and Chump but lately has been competing in WRL series endurance events (also known as - the Poorvette). We learned a lot working on that car that will apply to this TTC build, of course. One of the items we will replicate on our car is the roll cage, but due to time constraints (3 weeks to go!) before the first race we will only make the main hoop, harness bar and rear downbars (4 point roll bar) for now.

Image [url="http://vorshlag.smugmug.com/photos/i-R9s8rxn/1/X3/i-R9s8rxn-X3.jpg"]Image[/url]

We will go back and complete the full roll cage structure this car after the first event, to make everything safer (and to add some more ballast weight). Unlike this black 87, our 92 C4 has a roof - but its just a bolt-on targa panel, like all hardtop C4s. That removable roof panel makes it easier to build the cage and provides some aerodynamic advantages over the drop top, but the rear (glass) hatch main roof support structure will still be in the way and make this one a bit more challenging to build.

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Left: This is the seat we'll be using in the TTC car. Right: An adjustable seat back brace is visible in this pic

Another area that needs some attention fast is the seat mounting. The OEM seat that came with the car BROKE at an autocross event, which Matteucci warned me about ahead of time. We bought this Kirky 56700LW aluminum seat (see above left) for the Poorvette, but the driver wanted something different so we were stuck with it. This TTC4 project will get a lot of those cast away parts, some of which are brand new. Since the seat is a touch on the big side (17" width) we will make a poured foam seat insert, as well as a seat back brace tied to the cage (see above right)

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Due to the weird floor structure of the C4 chassis (some parts are composite and some are sheet metal), and some damage from a previous owner (aka: the Crack Head that tore up the interior and drove through the barbed wire fence), we need to repair and reinforce the floor areas. These cars are tricky to safely mount a racing seat into, as well as ballast plates, both of which we will need to do. The car is already 200 pounds under minimum weight (including a 200 pound driver) and that will only worsen as we (legally) replace OEM body panels and rear glass with lighter weight alternatives. We will run this car at the 3203 pound stated minimum weight and NOT burn points on running a lower weight. Running lighter might seem advantageous but we would have to lower the power output as well (the 12:1 ratio doesn't change for TTC class even if you burn points to "run lighter than minimum").

Image Image Image

Two zero-point mods Matteucci already added include the Moroso 20185 road race LT1 oil pan (allowed under TT rules, page 36), which at $288 includes more capacity, a Kicked-Out Sump and Trap Door Baffling for improved oil control, built-in Windage Screen and a port for an oil level sensor. The QuarterMaster 7.25" triple disc clutch ($599) and flywheel are also zero point mods (see page 36) and knocked nearly 50 pounds out of the drivetrain mass. It makes this little LT1 rev quite nicely and shift very well at speed - but driving it around at low speeds is a BITCH and it unlocks a LOT of transmission noise. Don't have accurate pics of these mods yet, but when we take them apart I will get better images and weights. I will include these "zero point" aftermarket part upgrades costs into our build budget, below.

Budget to Date

I don't like showing what I paid for cars, so for the purchase price shown is what Matteucci paid for the car three years ago (he bought it well!) - which was a running, full interior car but fairly rough inside when he got it. He cleaned it up a lot and I've cleaned it up further (spent about 8 hours detailing it this past weekend). On any OEM replacement parts we swap out I will show a "common street price" for what we use. Instead of showing labor costs I will show the logged hours spent on each task + material costs on anything we fabricate. The safety gear will be shown separately, as this is all entirely optional in a TT car, but still important to keep account of. The goal is to spend at or below $7500 for the car + performance upgrades + materials + one set of consumables.

Car Purchase: $3000
Recouped into budget: -$1000 for interior
Quarter master clutch: $599
Moroso oil pan: $288
Kirky racing seat: $0 (safety upgrade, $328 retail)
Total Spent so far: $2887

That's all for this time. I will post another update before the first race, January 17th at MSR-Houston, where we will debut the car in NASA's TTC class with me and Matteucci at the wheel. That's assuming everything goes smoothly! The next update will show some actual work being done besides my initial clean-up, and I will also lay out more of our game plan for the season, including which tires we plan to run with. They are 30mm smaller the stock size, but it will make sense why soon.

Cheers,

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2014 3:22 pm 
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fielding a one-asterix car that stays in base can be frustrating from a builder's standpoint, but can be rewarding from a driver's standpoint in the sense that "Well crap, can't change it so just gotta drive faster!!".

Will be keeping an eye on how this turns out :) should outrun my TTC/B car (depending on where A6s shake out :roll: and not ruining the drive-around streets either). Heberto - hope you've been busy this offseason tweaking ;) you're the only hope for all of the rotary world

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2014 8:31 pm 
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Ken, as you know, there is still a lot that can be done with a few points, and even a lot that can be done with no points. Best is that by combining a few low point and no point mods, we can do some truly great things.


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 31, 2014 8:48 am 
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Interested to see how you get around the +2 on the BTM brake rotor diameter...

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 05, 2015 11:31 pm 
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alwaysinboost wrote:
Interested to see how you get around the +2 on the BTM brake rotor diameter...



I'm going to be debuting my 2003 MINI Cooper S in TTC at MSR-H as well. I was hoping that Terry got something wrong in his interpretation of the rules, but he is spot on. This is a legal upgrade specific to the 92-96 LT1 powered base Corvette. The 1996 model came with the "Heavy Duty Brakes" as standard on the base model. So although they were an optional upgrade in 1992, they are legal under the updating/backdating rule because they were the standard brakes in a model of the model group listing and in the same generation. Great work maximizing your no point modifications, Terry!

I don't know how well my 1.6L, FWD, McPherson strut, brick of a car will do up against a V8 Corvette. Could there be any two cars as vastly different competing? I kinda feel like I'm bringing a knife to a gun fight. It should make for an interesting David vs. Goliath battle!

-bj

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